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Critique Album Homework Answers

 www.jarredantonacci.com
"Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend"
                                                                                                                                                                                                      – Ludwig van Beethoven, 1810

Music Forum 

Music Forum submission box is located under the current assignment, which is always at the top of the page

TEXT BOOK FOUND HERE

MIDTERM--3/21 The midterm exam will be given on Wednesday 3/21. A formal review will take place in class on Monday 3/19. In the meantime, you can begin studying the material as it is listed below.

​BRING A No.2 PENCIL


Section 1: 
Multiple Choice (38pts/2pts each)- Material will be taken from terms on Classical Tradition I  (Elements of Opera terms, composers and the pieces they wrote, and compositional styles from the period)

Section 2: 
Short Answers- Material will be taken from Classical Tradition II.
1. (18pts)– Name the three different sections of sonata form and describe what happens within the context of each section.
2. (32pts)– Name each instrumental family in the orchestra. Provide me with the names of four instruments in each section as well as the method of sound production for each family. 

Section 3: 
Essay (12pts)- Material will be taken from the textbook and the website. Discuss the prominent composers, compositional styles and pieces that are associated with the Baroque, Classical and Romantic Periods. What styles were developed within each time period? Who were the most prominent composers of each era, and what styles were they associated with? How did music evolve from the Baroque Period to the Nineteenth Century?

To aid your answer, additional material for the essay question can be found on the following pages within the textbook:
Part 3 (Baroque)- p.85-89
Part 4 (Classical)- p. 166-169
Part 5 (Nineteenth Century/Romantic)- p.233-237

These sections within the textbook provide information and insight on the cultural elements surrounding each period. This material is touched on in class, but expanded on inside the textbook. Your discussion should include elements of each period (composers, pieces, compositional styles, etc...) as well as other elements not covered in class, but contained within the three parts listed above. 
Due 3/5:

MUSIC APPROPRIATION ASSIGNMENT & READING
  • Musical appropriation is the use or adaptation of a work to serve something other than it's original purpose (ex. a popular song or classical/jazz pice being used in a commercial or advertisement). 
  • Contrafactum is a work setting new words to an established melody. (ex. God Save The Queen and My Country Tis' of Thee contain the same melody, however they share entirely different texts. The tune now known as The Star Spangled Banner first accompanied a text that was originally a drinking song). 

Your assignment for Monday is to find a song, or a piece that has been the subject of Musical Appropriation and Contrafactum–one song for each style (YouTube is best–you'll need to post the link below). After you've found your appropriate pieces, submit a paragraph or so for each song outlining some background information and information on the artist/composer and the original purpose or setting of the song and how it was reused (ex. this song was originally written for the 1986 Olympics, and was utilized in this commercial by...). 

To aid your search, consider artists or composers that have had pieces used in commercials or films. Consider pieces that have been theme songs for sports shows or events. There are several functional pieces of music that are used on a multitude of platforms. 

Submit your response in the box below. 
If you'd like to submit your Philadelphia Orchestra Documentary paper on the website, please do so below. This is due tomorrow (2/21). Submissions in class will be accepted. 

Due 2/26: Listening Comparison Assignment 

There are two pieces below, listen to each one (several times if need be) first, then communicate your best 1-page reaction in the box below. Deal with the pieces separately and together in your narrative as you see fit based on the two sets of questions below. 

1) Describe the experience of listening to an operatic aria versus more radio friendly popular music? 
2) How is the orchestra like or unlike the regular backing band you'd get in, say, rock music?
3) How well does the music fit the lyrics?
4) What is your feeling after the music ends?

Close your eyes often (entirely even) when listening to the Bach
1) What does this music sound like?
2) What do you think it was used for?
3) Tell me three aspects that stand out to you the most, and why (it can be anything from the piece itself [themes, moods, colors, etc...] or anything regarding the performance/player) 
Due 2/19: 
  • NARRATIVE RESPONSE: As we begin the next section of the course, The Classical Tradition, I want to begin by introducing a rather peculiar article written a few years ago. Click on this link to read a short excerpt from a book on the state of classical music by Julliard professor Greg Sandow. Read Sandow's thoughts on the dilemma that classical music is faced with, and provide me with a summary of the points he discussed. After this, I want you to offer your opinion on classical music, and whether or not you think there are any issues, and what they might be. 

This is assignment is to be 1-2 pages in length (double spaced) and submitted in the box below. 
UPDATE!! CLASS IS CANCELED ON WEDNESDAY 2/7. TEST IS NOW MONDAY 2/12. 

​TEST ON BASIC ELEMENTS OF MUSIC WILL BE ON MONDAY 2/12.


(BRING A NO. 2 PENCIL)


Study everything from the Introduction/Music Fundamentals section of the the website. We will be having a test on Monday 2/12.  This test will be in three parts:
  • Listening (homophonic, monophonic, polyphonic, musical form)
  • Multiple choice (elements of music terms & note values) 
  • Reading comprehension (Copland reading on How We Listen). 
The only piece of information that isn't included on the Basic Elements page is the information on note values (durational symbols). Use the notes that were given in class to study. Please prepare accordingly- YOU MUST STUDY. 
Due 1/29: Practice Rhythmic Duet #1 (top line only) &  NARRATIVE RESPONSE (20 points):  
  1. Practice the treble clef line from the first rhythmic duet. We'll be working on this in class on Monday, and add the bass clef line as well.
  2. Click on the link and read the Copland excerpt titled How We Listen . In a 1 – 1/2 page response, summarize his discussion of musical planes and their respective functions.
  3. Next, in the same summary from above, analyze your own method of listening and figure out which musical plane you fit into (it is possible to be in two at once... really think about it before you answer). Is it possible for everyone to access all three planes? Explain your thoughts.

​This assignment should be typed into a word processing document (double spaced) and pasted in the submission box below. Press SUBMIT when you're done. 
DUE 1/22: Email & Rhythm Video Response (20 points total)
  • Send me an email from your CCC account. If you do not know how to do this, click here. If you simply cannot figure it out, then email me from the account you check most. I encourage use of your CCC account as it is the only medium of communication the college considers official. Either way–email me at jantonacci@faculty.camdencc.edu. Include your name in the subject of the email. In the body of the email, please tell me the following information:

1.  What is your major and year of study?
2. What kind of music do you enjoy listening to? Who is your favorite artist/composer/piece?
3. What are you hoping to gain from taking this class?
4. Do you have any prior musical training (singing lessons, instrumental lessons in high school or earlier, guitar/drum lessons, etc...). If you have, please specify. 

  • Watch the rhythm video below (only the video on the left) and take notes– don't wait until the night before, as the movie is over 47 minutes in length. I want you to tell me what information was contained in the video, and what did you find most interesting? What aspect of music are you eager to learn about this semester? Format your response in the submission box below and submit. Be prepared to discuss the topics covered in the video at our next class meeting. ​
WEDNESDAY 12/13 NO CLASS.

​Early album reviews or drafts can be submitted through email (jantonacci@faculty.camdencc.edu) or through the submission box below. The final due date and class with recorded attendance is Monday 12/18.
DUE 12/11: Song Analysis (BRING HEADPHONES & LAPTOP/IPAD FOR CLASS)

I want you to complete a song analysis on a song from your album (remember, you'll need three for the review)–– Type your analysis into a word processing document and save it along the way––when you're done with your analysis, copy and paste in the box below. I will critique your analysis and comment with suggestions for revision. Please keep the notes and suggestions from your first analysis in mind when completing the next one. 

Don't forget to utilize whosampled.com! 

When completing a song analysis, detail the following information: 

1. Song Form 
2. Instrumentation 
3. Hierarchy of Instruments/Voice 
4. Overall sound of ensemble 
5. Additional effects 
6. Lyrical content/meaning (how well do the lyrics fit the music?) 
7. Any additional information you feel is important to the discussion 
8. Measure the level of creativity (lyrically and musically)
DUE 12/4: Two Assignments (submit together)

PART 1: Sgt. Peppers Narrative REVIEW OF THE REVIEW


Listen to a few tracks from The Beatles album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (you can find recordings on YouTube, or Spotify, or iTunes) and read the corresponding review below. In a 1.5/2 page paper, tell me how much of the review is dedicated to each of the areas outlined on the album review assignment. 
  • ​What would you have liked to know more about?
  • Did the review present any questions? 
  • Did the review concentrate too heavily on a particular topic? 

In other words, does the reviewer spend a significant amount of time talking about the making of the album, instead of how it sounds and what is actually said? Based on your listening, how do you feel about the music itself, and the review associated with it? Utilize methods outlined above in forming your opinion–how well are the areas covered, if at all? Please be sure to note which review you were assigned (Esquire, Rolling Stone or Pitchfork) for my clarification. 

SUBMIT YOUR SGT. PEPPERS NARRATIVE IN THE BOX BELOW.

PDF  documents are organized by last name, download the copy that corresponds with your last name below. 
Part 2: Album Review Draft (SUBMIT ALONG WITH THE RESPONSE ABOVE)

​I want a one page outline of your review. On your outline, I want you to include the following information: 
  • Construct a basic outline for your assignment (bio info/influential info/review info/contextual info/musical info
  • Compile pertinant biographical information about your artist/band (Jeopardy information...)
  • Compile information regarding influences of your artist/band. What person or group of people are responsible for the mentoring of your artist/who most influenced their musical creativity.
  • Read reviews (refer to this web page for the links to review sites) on the album you're doing. Find more than one review and analyze the approach taken by each critic. After you've compiled reviews on the album you've chosen, look at the album that preceded the one you're doing and repeat the same process. Ask yourself: Are there any differences/similarities between the most current album and the previous one? When completing a review, you need to contextualize other aspects that surround the album (ie. what came before it...and how was it received?). 
The aforementioned aspects of your album review will be contained in the opening page(s), while a majority of your critique will focus on the treatment of the music itself. It is only after this information is sought out and drafted that we can begin incorporating the musical discussion. 

Submit your outline/draft below
DUE 11/29 (Narrative Response): CLICK HERE to read the article titled Making Cents.

In a one page response, communicate your best reaction to the material discussed.
  • Are the artists being ripped off?
  • Does the fact that Spotify and Pandora (much like YouTube and Rhapsody) function as promotional tools support an argument that the artists "should just be happy to get their material out" instead of being adequately compensated?
  • What are your thoughts on this subject?
  • Is the age of multimedia and technological growth aiding or hindering the music industry? Be thorough. 

​Submit your response in the box below.
11/20EARLY BLUES AND JAZZ TEST

Your test will not be in the form of short answers and will consist of the following information (all of which can be found on the Early Blues & Jazz page).

For those in good academic standing, this test is optional- your attendance is mandatory either way. I'll be taking this test grade and comparing it to the test grade from the fundamentals test at the beginning of the semester and I'll drop the lower of the two grades. If you got an A on the first test, or you're generally satisfied with your grade, you can simply show up on Monday and turn in your test unfinished, but you need to show up. All absences will be counted. 

Know the following information:

  • Sacred Music (3 types)
  • Secular Music (3 types)
  • Theatrical forms of entertainment (3 types)
  • Describe why Ragtime and Vaudeville were influential 
  • Two styles of piano playing to emerge from Vaudeville/ performers of each style
  • Country Blues vs. City Blues 
  • List the differences (five characteristics for each one) 
  • List performers of Country Blues
  • List performers of City Blues
  • What musician was responsible for the popularity of Dixieland music? 
Dixieland- 
  • Typical instrumentation
  • List three to five characteristics of Dixieland music
Due 11/13- Listening (respond on the blog below): 

Listening: Click on the links below to listen to each video. Describe as many musical elements as you can that would categorize this music to be of the blues genre. Listen and describe the following: instruments, form, performance style (the mood or effect that was implied through the way the performers played) and lyric implication (meaning of the lyrics- look them up if you need to). Musically– describe what's happening (are there any solos? if so, how many and what instruments?).

Describe the music as best you can. After the musical description, deal with the lyrics. Does the feel/mood of the song match the lyrical content? What message is the performer(s) conveying? What are the similarities and differences between each track? 

BE THOROUGH.

Muddy Waters- CLICK HERE
Ray Charles- CLICK HERE
DUE 11/6- Blues America Questions- Part 2

In the box below, please submit answers to the following questions, related to the second half of the Blues America film.

  1. What town was known to be the place for work; stockyards, steel mills and domestic work?
  2. A generation of foreword thinking blues artists was emerging from Chicago, what was the name of the family that started a record business in the 1950’s and signed Muddy Waters as their client? 
  3. What Mississippi born blues musician took his records to the top of the charts in 1949?
  4. As Rock and Roll emerged, musician Chuck Berry played a recording for Leonard Chess of a new style of music. This song had come to be known as Maybellene. This name was a change, at the request of Chess. What was the original name of the song?
  5. What was the controversy surrounding the death of Robert Johnson? He is said to have died from either one of three reasons, what were they?
  6. What year was Robert Johnson, King of the Blues Singers released?
  7. What rock band described themselves as ‘blues missionaries’? What country were they from?
  8. What electric blues musician had zero interest in acoustic guitars and oppression era Mississippi?
  9. Blues influenced new musical directions, as the 60’s evolved into the 70’s, blues rock evolved into what genre? This genre would eventually morph into Heavy Metal.
  10. Stevie Ray Vaughn and Robert Cray were credited with a blues revival during what decade? During this era, what was the name of the band that recorded a music video featuring John Lee Hooker called the Healer?
DUE 10/11: Handout from the film, Music From The Inside Out
​(Philadelphia Orchestra Documentary)
Due 9/25:  Listening Comparison

SUBMISSION:
  • Watch both of the videos below. Both clips are in the same style, yet both are done completely different from each other. I want you to watch and listen to each clip, and in a one page response tell me the following: 
  1. Song Form (using ABC syllables instead of 'verse' 'chorus')
  2. Instrumentation
  3. Solos, and the order of the solos (if applicable)
  4. Your general opinion of the differences and similarities between each recording-  consider and discuss the difference in the arrangement as well as the execution of the performance (performance style)
4/12- Choose Album for Review

Look over the Album Review assignment and choose an artist/band to review (have something chosen for next class). While making your decisions, try and choose someone you aren't familiar with, or a style of music you aren't familiar with.

​The goal here is to reach beyond the boundaries that make you comfortable. It's really easy to write about music in a style or genre that you're familiar with, but I encourage you to search beyond the boundaries of familiarity. The experience you'll gain from this assignment, if you take that approach, will be significant.
DUE 4/10: NARRATIVE RESPONSE SUBMISSION

Look over the Album Review assignment and choose an artist/band to review (have something chosen for next class). While making your decisions, try and choose someone you aren't familiar with, or a style of music you aren't familiar with. The goal here is to reach beyond the boundaries that make you comfortable.
Due 11/9: My sincerest apologies for not being able to make it in this morning. Septa has caused traffic to completely swamp both bridges into New Jersey- getting there is an impossibility (and I've been trying since 7:50am). We were going to cover this film and other lecture notes today, in lieu of class, please watch this film and respond to the six questions below. Thank you, and I'll see you Wednesday- with midterms graded. 

Please watch the video below, and answer the following questions. We'll have a discussion of Early Blues on Wednesday. 
  1. Who was the first male blues guitarist to be recorded? What year did he record? 
  2. During the prohibition era, what type of acts went on tour?
  3. Who popularized blues as a 12-bar format?
  4. Who was considered the greatest and most influential of the classical blues period?
  5. How much money did this influential performer earn per week, during her 'hay-day'?
  6. Toward the end of the classic blues period, guitarists took to accompanying featured female singers- who is the famous guitarist mentioned in the film? 
Due 4/18:

Life Soundtrack Essay (50pts–submit in narrative response submission form below)
  • In a two page (double spaced) narrative, write two stories about major life experiences (positive or negative) that you or someone you know has experienced. If music were to accompany each story, what would it sound like– describe the  genre, mood, instruments, texture, etc…don't just give me a pre-existing song, be creative. 
  • How would the music vary from one story to the next? Your narrative should include as much musical description as possible, within the context of each story (be CREATIVE). Submit this into the Response submission form below.


Due 4/13: Jazz Listening Louis/Ella & Mingus 

The two videos below represent two very different musical narratives. Listen to each video and describe the following separately (you may have to listen more than once):
  • Describe the instrumentation for each recording 
  • Describe the different sections (form) that are present in each track
  • If there are any solos, list the order of instruments and describe as best you can the style of each solo
  • Describe the similarities and differences between each track and any other pertinent information or observations you may find interesting 
Due 2/15:
1. Song Analysis


​Listen to the embedded video below, and formulate a response in the box below based off the following questions:
  • What is the instrumentation of the ensemble?
  • What instruments play the melody?
  • Can you characterize the general mood of the song?
  • Describe the order of the instrumental solos, and specifically what each solo sounded like (moods that were triggered, ways in which the solo was played [ie. longer notes, more sustained- OR- very fast, virtuosic playing], as well as which solo you preferred the most and why?
  • Does this piece have clearly definable sections, that sound vastly different from one another? If so, how many different sections did you hear?
  • Any other interesting observations you made about the way in which the musicians interact with one another​
Due 2/8: 

1. Song Analysis

​Listen to the embedded video below, and formulate a response in the box below based off the following questions:
  • What is the instrumentation of the ensemble?
  • What instruments play the melody?
  • Can you characterize the general mood of the song?
  • Describe the order of the instrumental solos, and specifically what each solo sounded like (moods that were triggered, ways in which the solo was played [ie. longer notes, more sustained- OR- very fast, virtuosic playing], as well as which solo you preferred the most and why?
  • Does this piece have clearly definable sections, that sound vastly different from one another? If so, how many different sections did you hear?
  • Any other interesting observations you made about the way in which the musicians interact with one another


2. PRACTICE: 
  1. Both duets in 1a focus on rhythm in a triple meter (3/4). Practice slowly and concentrate on rhythms before adding the accents. 
  2. Duet part 2a introduces the time signature with most of the rhythmic values we've studied so far (quarter note/rest [1beat], eighth note/rest [half of one beat].  
  3. Duet 2b eases up on the rhythmic complexity and concentrates on accents, practice slowly and with the metronome. In your practicing, write down any questions or problems you're encountering and feel free to bring them up in class. I'm sure there are others who have the same issues, don't be afraid to ask questions, that's why you're there. 
Due 3/9: Listening The Rite of Spring (Le Sacre du printemps) 1913– Igor Stravinsky

Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring (Le Sacre du printemps) was so new and different that the audience at its premiere in Paris in 1913 rioted. Many found the harmonies, melodies, and rhythms to be beyond the limits of the acceptable, and they let their feelings be knowns. Yet within a few years it became an audience favorite around the world and remains so today.  

In Ballet, music tells a story through movement. The idea of interpreting sound through gesture on stage has a long history, dating back to ancient times. Many operas, from the Baroque Era onward, have incorporated dance scenes. But the ballet as an independent genre–the focus of an evening's entertainment –did not come into its own until the nineteenth century. It has flourished since that time, however, thanks to the works like Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring. 

Stravinsky's Rite was commissioned by Sergei Diaghilev for his Ballets Russes (The Russian Ballet), a company of largely Russian dancers who's home base was in Paris. The score follows the scenario of the ballot Stravinsky himself recalls as having first conceived in "a fleeting vision which came to me as a complete surprise...I saw in my imagination a solemn pagan rite. Sage elders, seated in a c rice, watched a young girl dance herself to death. They were sacrificing her to propitiate the God of Spring. I heard and I wrote what I heard. I am the belles through which Le Sacre passed." In the end, the scenario of the ballet was drawn up by Stravinsky and Nikolai Roerich, a leading expert in Russian folklore and ancient ritual. Originally called The Great Sacrifice, The ballet was eventually divided into two parts: (1) The Adoration of the Earth, and (2) The Sacrifice.

ASSIGNMENT: Watch the Rite in it's entirety, and formulate a reaction in the submission box below. While listening, consider the following:

Harmony: Are all the harmonies here tonal or atonal? (tonal meaning consonant, atonal meaning dissonant). 
Form: Is the form of this piece easily recognizable, with clearly defined sections?
Choreography: Are you able to discern the story? The dancers present through movement and gesture the storyline of the ballet, what images, events, or moods come to mind as you listen to this music?
Timbre: This is an enormous orchestra, listen to the variety of sounds in all families of instruments: woodwinds  brass, strings, and percussion.
DUE 3/2: LISTENING: This assignment will be in two parts; a review of the musical components that construct the piece as well as a review of the performers' execution of the piece.

Theme & Variations Listening: Arthur Pryor (1870-1942)- Blue Bells of Scotland (circa 1905)

Listen to the recording below and formulate a response (submitted in the box below) based on the following components (you'll need to listen more than one time): 
  • Melody- Listen for the introductory theme, after the opening cadenza. With each section that goes by, what aspect of the music is being variated? The melody? Accompaniment? Please explain. 
  • Form- Listen to the structure of the work as a whole. How many parts does this piece have (introductory material, variations, interludes, etc...)?  **The unaccompanied sections are called cadenzas**
  • Timbre/Texture- Listen to the accompanying ensemble throughout the piece. How does the ensemble vary when the soloist is playing as opposed to when he isn't playing? Listen for the accompanying material behind the soloist, as well as the interludes between variations. 

Let's also consider the musician's execution of the performance (consider yourselves 'reviewers' and don't treat this like an opinion-based response:
  1. What is most impressive about the work (consider the compositional construct AND the way in which is has been performed)
  2. How would this piece sound if it were arranged for piano? Would a performance with a pianist change the interpretation of the performer? What elements (if any) would he/she need to take into account? 
PRACTICE:
Work on Duet Part I (top and bottom lines) from Rhythm Exercise Sheet 1. Utilize the metronome website for practicing.  Suggested tempo is between 60-72. Duet part 2 is a focus on eighth rests and accents. 
  • Concentrate on just the rhythms at the moment, if you feel as though you're able to play them correctly then add the accents. Remember–two eighth notes equals one quarter note (or one beat). Practice slowly and count the rhythms as you play. You may be asked to play parts of each duet for next class–give it your best. ​






Due 12/8: 

Album Review Draft

Read the entire post, you will be submitting your album critique drafts for review. Your critique will be in two parts:

Part one- The Band/Artist
  • Compile biographical information about your artist/band (Jeopardy information...)
  • Compile information regarding influences of your artist/band. What person or group of people are responsible for the mentoring of your artist/who most influenced their musical creativity.
  • Read reviews (refer to the lyrical analysis page for links to review sites) on the album you're doing. Find more than one review and analyze the approach taken by each critic. After you've compiled reviews on the album you've chosen, look at the album that preceded the one you're doing and repeat the same process. Are there any differences/similarities between the most current album and the previous one? When completing a review, you need to contextualize other aspects that surround the album (ie. what came before it...and how was it received?)
  • The aforementioned aspects of your album review will be contained in the opening page(s), while a majority of your critique will focus on the treatment of the music itself. It is only after this information is sought out and drafted that we can begin incorporating the musical discussion. 

Part two- The Music
  • I want you to complete a song analysis on one song from your album (you'll need more than one for the final review, but I only want to look at one for  now)–– Type your analysis into a word processing document and save it along the way––when you're done with your analysis, submit your draft into the box below. I will critique your analysis and comment with suggestions for revision. 

When completing a song analysis, detail the following information in this order:
  • Song Form
  • Instrumentation
  • Hierarchy of Instruments/Voice
  • Overall sound of ensemble
  • Additional effects
  • Lyrical content/meaning (how well do the lyrics fit the music?)


Submit your draft in the box below. 
Due 12/1: EXTRA CREDIT: 

The Miles Davis Story– NARRATIVE RESPONSE (50pts)

Jazz is a music and culture about life through  struggle and success. Often, success is only possible through working out " issues" with a collection of others. In this way, jazz music represents democracy more than other styles. Jazz is a music that reflects hard work, determination, discipline and team work. It celebrates listening, communicating and curiosity. It is a music about spontaneous energy and rhythm. At its best, it reflects all that is unique about the artist and all that is beautiful about human connections.

Features of jazz to consider:
  • Swing feel
  • Spontaneous
  • Conversational
  • Improvisation
  • Dynamic energy shifts
  • Introspective
  • Exploration
  • Fine details
  • Quick changes in emotion 
  • Different hierarchy 

Miles Davis (trumpeter) was an ambassador of jazz, whose career changed the course of music several times. The video below, The Miles Davis Story is a look inside the life and music of Miles Davis.

1. Watch The Miles Davis Story

2. In a 2–3 page paper, communicate your best reaction to what you learned about Miles Davis, jazz music and the musicians who contributed to it's development. Reference as much of the film as you can. 

This assignment is to be typed and submitted in person on Monday 12/1 for credit. 


DUE 11/26: NARRATIVE RESPONSE (50pts): 

CLICK HERE to read the article titled Making Cents. In a 1 1/2–2 page response, communicate your best reaction to the material discussed. Are the artists being ripped off? Does the fact that Spotify and Pandora (much like YouTube and Rhapsody) function as promotional tools support an argument that the artists "should just be happy to get their material out" instead of being adequately compensated? What are your thoughts on this subject? Is the age of multimedia and technological growth aiding or hindering the music industry? 


Submit your response below.
Our class will be divided into several groups–consider these groups to be your ensemble. The focus of our next week is to understand what it means to read musical rhythms, as well as to understand basic fundamentals regarding playing together in an ensemble context.

Our recording session will be in L16 on Monday 9/22 Report to the usual classroom at first–we'll take attendance and head over as a class. 
Due 10/21: READING

If you have not begun reading any of the material from the sections we've discussed over the past few weeks, I've included all essential readings for the midterm exam next Friday (10/25). Readings for Monday include the following:

Part  5 The Nineteenth Century- p. 233–237
  • Chapter 27- Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No. 5 in C Minor p. 240-246
  • Chapter 30- Hector Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique, Mvt IV (March to the Scaffold) p. 261-266

Begin studying terms from the following:

You should have already read and taken notes on the following:

Part 3 The Baroque Era- p.85–89
  • Chapter 10- Claudio Monteverdi, Orpheus, selection from Act III p.92-97
  • Chapter 11- Henry Purcell, Dido and Aeneas, Overture and Act I p.98-104
  • Chapter 14- Johann Sebastian Bach, Fugue in G Minor, BWV 578 p.118-125 


Part 4 The Classical Era- p.166–169
  • Chapter 20- Joseph Hayden, String Quartet in C Major, Mvt. II p.172-179
  • Chapter 23- Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550 Mvt. 1 p.197-204
CLICK HERE FOR TEXTBOOK
Due 7/10: 
  • Read the packed titled What Is Jazz? that was passed out during class. Tomorrow we will be discussing elements covered. 

  • NARRATIVE RESPONSE (50pts): In a 1 1/2–2 page response, write two stores of a major life experience (positive or negative) that you or someone you know has experienced. If music were to accompany each story, what would it sound like– consider the  genre, mood, instruments, texture, etc... How would the music vary from one story to the next? Why? Be as descriptive as possible. If you're going to relate your story to an existing song, you need to explain why you chose the songs for each story (and stretch beyond the lyrical implication). I'd prefer this assignment to be typed (double spaced). 
Due 7/3:

  • Formulate 3-5 questions for Steve Tirpak tomorrow. These questions will be collected at the end of class for a grade–be creative! There aren't many opportunities to spend time with people on this side of the industry–now is your chance to ask questions, so take advantage of it.  If you'd like to learn more about Mr. Tirpak click here to be directed to his website. Steve will be talking about the following topics:

  1. Composing/arranging for popular music
  2. The recording industry
  3. Multi-tracking in ProTools 
  4. Music business (royalties/songwriters/producers/BMI/ASCAP/EMI/licensing)
  5. Touring with popular artists/life on the road


  • PART 2: Consider the style of music that you enjoy and choose your favorite track– now listen to only the melody (try and ignore everything else)–is it complex? Simple?. After isolating the melody, listen to the same track again– isolate everything else BUT the melody. Measure the level of creativity in the melody and supporting accompaniment– what instruments do you hear? Does anything change (musically) from verse to verse? . Try your best to describe what you hear– stretch beyond the lyrics. Include a YouTube link in your post to aid your description. 


CONCERT REVIEWS ARE DUE FRIDAY 12/12

PRINTED, STAPLED, IN MY HAND ON FRIDAY–NO EXCEPTIONS. 

Rhythm

Melody

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Part 1
​(For those who were absent today, or making up the midterm. Questions for Part 1 are below in the embedded file)
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For casual fans of Daft Punk, mostly familiar with the group through 2001's now unanimously beloved Discovery LP and 2013's chart-hopscotching smash "Get Lucky," returning to 1997's Homework -- the debut album from robots terribles Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo -- might be a jarring, if not downright alienating experience. There's no Nile Rodgers six-string disco-funk, barely any plush '70s soft-rock keys, and surprisingly little of the vocodered, dehumanized vocals inextricable to the group today; outside of hit single "Around the World" and a handful of interludes, the record is almost entirely instrumental. Instead, there's a lot of mercilessly pounding 4/4 beats, bass that throbs like a telltale heart, and scorching synths that crank the "acid" in acid house all the way to 0 on the pH scale. Compared to the electro-shock assault of Homework, a later crowd-pleaser like "Harder Better Faster Stronger" sounds... well, like not many of those titular adjectives.

Of course, at the time, the album made total sense. Daft Punk's early singles -- and the duo has since admitted that Homework was essentially a glorified singles compilation -- were mostly in this pulverizing mold, particularly their international breakthrough hit, "Da Funk," a stomping disco rager with a growling, instrumentally ambiguous riff that proved one of the decade's most inflammable hooks. Moreover, it was a very aggro time in mainstream dance music in general: The big beat invasion, heralded for years on the momentum of increasingly popular block-rocking singles by U.K. acts like The Prodigy and The Chemical Brothers, fashioned electronic music into something that could soundtrack X Games montages. With alternative rock fading in cultural prominence, due to the radio dilution of grunge and the dissolution of many of the genre's marquee bands, it seemed like these dance acts were primed for a cultural takeover.

Daft Punk was connected to this moment -- "Da Funk" appeared alongside Underworld and Moby on the star-studded soundtrack to 1997's The Saint, and the duo's boundlessly imaginative music videos played in rotation on MTV's AMP next to clips from Orbital and The Crystal Method -- but they weren't really part of it. They were French, not British, and much more rooted in traditional house than most of their contemporaries, many of whom had started to integrate jungle breakbeats and IDM unpredictability into their soundscapes, along with hip-hop grooves and rock bombast. But in retrospect, what really separates Daft Punk from the rest of the electronic Class of '97 is that unlike their peers -- nearly all of whom peaked in popularity in the back half of the '90s -- they outgrew their era exponentially. And that's in large part because when it came to dance's ability to cross over to rock fans, Thomas and Guy-Manuel were the only ones to take the long view.

The Robots were certainly no strangers to rock music. They started out as a coldly received, guitar-based act in the early '90s; the phrase "Daft Punk" came from a negative review of one of their gigs in British indie rag Melody Maker. But once they embraced house music, they left their alt trappings behind, and Homework is a defiantly unrock album, almost entirely absent traditional analog instrumentation -- "Da Funk" might have a riff to go ten rounds with "Smells Like Teen Spirit" and "Loser" for the honor of the decade's best, but actual guitars had little to do with its creation.

Homework didn't need associate itself with rock stars past or present to establish its credibility; there's no Noel Gallagher or Keith Flint present to give the group an identifiable mouthpiece, and the lone traditional rock figure name-checked in the inspired-by roll-call "Teachers" is the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson. Even the song literally titled "Rock'n Roll" is a thumping epic of dance-floor build-and-release with an atonal synth hook coarse enough to scrape the paint off a Fender Stratocaster -- the only thing it has to do with Chuck Berry is that both make you want to throw a garbage can through a skylight if you play them loudly enough.

And that last part's the key. Despite being trumpeted as the future of music and spawning a handful of minor hit singles (and one No. 1 Billbaord 200 album), the big beat phenomenon quickly sputtered out in the U.S. mainstream, as young rock fans decided they preferred the more explicit adolescent fury of nu-metal peddled by the likes of KoRn and Limp Bizkit. Meanwhile, Daft Punk disappeared for a couple years and returned at the turn of the millennium in nearly unrecognizable form, having reinvented themselves as a sublimely filtered disco-pop wrecking crew, still singularly mechanized but not nearly so heartless -- and, even though they conceded to some more conventional song structures, still indelibly unrock.

It took some adjusting Stateside -- Discovery was met with mixed reviews in the U.S. upon its 2001 release -- but its rep grew with every passing year, culminating in a rapturously received 2006 Coachella gig that cemented the duo as the north star of modern dance music, as it became abundantly clear that the Robots had the right idea all along. Today, Homework sounds less dated than any other major electronic album from 1997, because it turns out the big beat paragons weren't thinking nearly big enough. The Chemical Brothers and The Prodigy imagined a world in which electronic music and rock had fused inextricably. Daft Punk dreamed of a future in which electronic music simply was rock.

And though it took some time, the latter prediction is certainly the one that's been borne out. The most important American musical phenomenon of the '10s is probably big-tent EDM, a movement with little explicit rock influence, aside from the fact that its biggest stars can whip festival crowds into a violent lather the way Red Hot Chili Peppers and Rage Against the Machine might have two decades earlier. And while "Firestarter" and "Setting Sun" certainly had something to do with paving the way for that, it's Daft Punk whose example is really being followed when a mostly programmed song like Skrillex's "Bangarang" gets transposed for the Guitar Hero video game series, or when an incendiary instrumental with one warped vocal line like Baauer's "Harlem Shake" briefly takes over the Internet and the charts. Daft Punk became rock stars without the help of rock music, and it's their Revolution 909 that's provided the core curriculum for DJs in the decades since.