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Dcu Nursing Assignment Submission Sheet

Student Resources

Student Handbook

(This edition dated 1st October 2013.)

'Truth is never pure and rarely simple.'
- Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

Click here for a listing of the CONTENTS of this handbook.

Editor's Note:

This handbook is intended to act as a guide addressing some of the questions most commonly asked by students. We should stress at the outset that at university, primary responsibility for gathering information relevant to progress through academic life lies with you the student. The onus is on you to check course requirements, to keep abreast of deadlines, to understand what conditions may be imposed on your taking one option or another etc. To this end we would encourage you to become familiar with the DCU website and to check your DCU email for messages from lecturers on at least a daily basis.

It should also be borne in mind that this handbook does not claim to be a definitive guide to every problem you may encounter. Rather it is a work in progress which will be updated on an ongoing basis. To this end any comments, corrections or any suggestions that might improve it will be welcomed by the editors who will include them in updated versions. Speak to your programme board chair.

Disclaimer:

Though every effort has been made to ensure that this document is accurate and up-to-date it should not be taken as legally binding.


CONTENTS:

HOW WE'RE ORGANISED
WHOM TO CONTACT
USING EMAIL
REGISTERING & CHANGING MODULES
PORTAL PAGE
ATTENDANCE
MOODLE
PROGRESSION
DEADLINES AND DELIVERY
DEADLINE EXTENSIONS
GRADING STRUCTURES
WHAT YOUR MARKS MEAN
EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES
COMPENSATION
RECHECKS
APPEALS
RESITTING FAILED MODULES
REPEATING FAILED MODULES
WRITING AN ESSAY
THESIS GUIDELINES
PLAGIARISM: DEFINITION
PLAGIARISM: PENALTIES
TECHNICIANS’ OFFICES AND LOANS
EQUIPMENT TERMS AND CONDITIONS
STUDIOS AND LABS
Appendix 1: WRITING A GOOD ESSAY
Appendix 2: ESSAY PRESENTATION FORMAT
Appendix 3: REFERENCING GUIDELINES
Appendix 4: ASSIGNMENT DECLARATION


HOW WE'RE ORGANISED

The School of Communications is home to three undergraduate degrees and seven post-grad degrees. We call them programmes, and each is managed by a Programme Board. You will need to know who is in charge of your programme.

ProgrammeChairRoomPhone*email
BA Communication StudiesDr Neil O’BoyleC1786593neil.oboyle@dcu.ie
BA JournalismDr Jane SuiterC1696393steven.knowlton@dcu.ie
BSc MultimediaMartin G MolonyC1305203martin.molony@dcu.ie
MA Film & TelevisionDr. Debbie GingC1798355debbie.ging@dcu.ie
MA JournalismPaul McNamaraC1705202paul.mcnamara@dcu.ie
MA Political CommunicationDr Kevin RafterC1265082kevin.rafter@dcu.ie
MSc MultimediaKarl GrimesC1715215karl.grimes@dcu.ie
MSc Science CommunicationDr Padraig MurphyC1417703padraig.murphy@dcu.ie
MA International Journalism StudiesProf Steven KnowltonC1485424steven.knowlton@dcu.ie
MA in Social Media StudiesDr Eugenia SiaperaC1756119neil.oboyle@dcu.ie

*off campus, phone (01) 700-xxxx

Each programme is made up of modules (specific units of study, like CM107 Introduction to Social Studies, delivered over a semester of 12 weeks). Usually you do six modules per semester. Some of them will be delivered by other schools within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Science – like LG101 Introduction to Law, taught by members of the School of Law & Government.

WHOM TO CONTACT

Your point of contact for information or advice depends on the nature of your query. For specific academic questions, the most useful person to see is the lecturer who teaches that module: in class, just after class, or email for an appointment. If it is something that concerns the whole class (like a clash of assignment deadlines), bring it up with your elected class representatives, rather than having a lot of people contact the lecturer with the same point. For group issues that concern more than one module, the class representatives should see your programme chair. If it is a personal matter, undergraduates should contact the student advisor for their programme, listed below:

ProgrammeStudent AdvisorRoomPhone*eMail
BA Communication StudiesDr Neil O'BoyleC21786593Neil.OBoyle@dcu.ie
BA JournalismProf Colum KennyC1685235Colum.Kenny@dcu.ie
BSc MultimediaKarl GrimesC1715215karl.grimes@dcu.ie

*off campus, phone (01) 700-xxxx

You may also visit the Student Advice Centre, on the ground floor of the Henry Grattan Building – opposite the restaurant. Graduate students should contact their programme chair
.

USING EMAIL

You are expected to use e-mail in a professional manner and refrain from any comments which could be regarded as disrespectful or offensive. Bear in mind that e-mails are easily misunderstood and therefore it is important to ensure that the message conveys the intended tone (i.e. professional, friendly, courteous). Think of your correspondence over e-mail as practice for the work environment after university.

Follow these guidelines for effective communication:

  • Always use your @dcu.ie account for DCU business
  • Insert a relevant subject line, including your programme and the module name if relevant. (e.g. 'CS request for meeting on choice of modules')
  • Begin the e-mail with a salutation (e.g. Hi Tom/Dear Professor X)
  • In the body of the e-mail, state who you are (e.g. student in the CM104 module), explain the purpose of your e-mail, make a polite request, thank the receiver and sign off properly (e.g. kind regards, best wishes)
  • Adopt a friendly and personable tone.
  • Do not write anything that you would not be happy for everyone to see or that you would not say to the recipient’s face.
  • Proof-read your e-mail before you send it. Do not give the impression that you do not wish to take the time to write properly.
  • Be careful with your user name or any tagline on your e-mail (‘lazysod’ as a tagline may be amusing to friends, but is not appropriate if the email is sent to DCU staff or potential employers).
  • Do not use text abbreviations such as ‘b4’, ‘gr8’ etc. in an e-mail

Before mailing, think about whether you can find what you need on the DCU web, or by asking a question in class; and do not send the same request for information to more than one person at once.

REGISTERING & CHANGING MODULES

Some of your modules are core – you have to take them. Others are options, from which you choose the required number. You register your choice for both semesters at the beginning of the academic year in September, but you can change your mind.

Changing your choice of options for most modules is free of charge in the first and second week of each semester, and there is a fee in the third week – do it from your portal page. (Some production modules in the second year of the BSc in Multimedia do not allow a change of mind.)

But bear in mind that lecturers will not be able to make special arrangements for you if you turn up to lectures for the first time in week three: if you have doubts, attend all modules you are thinking about for the first two weeks.

PORTAL PAGE

Your portal page is your personal home page on the DCU web site. It includes information about your timetable, modules you are registered for, and much more. Just go to www.dcu.ie/portal, and enter your DCU computer account password.

ATTENDANCE

Attendance at class should be regarded as compulsory. Students who do not attend class regularly are likely to have poor grades or, indeed, fail. Individual lecturers are not required to issue warnings to students with poor attendance records. The responsibility for attending class lies solely with you. Although a roll may be not called, lecturers do note student attendance patterns. Good time-keeping, regular attendance and active participation in workshops and seminars are required of all students.

In addition you should note that it is your responsibility to keep up with the progress of the course. If you are unable to attend classes you should inform the lecturer of this and make it your business to ascertain what you missed and to acquire any course materials given out during your absence.

LOOP

LOOP is DCU’s online learning environment through which lecturers can give electronic access to material like lecture notes, and activities like discussion forums – a bit like a Facebook group for each module.

The use of LOOP varies from module to module – some use it a little, some use it a lot. Individual lecturers will speak to you about the requirements for their module. It is essential that you to become comfortable with this environment as soon as possible, as it will be used throughout your studies at DCU. Go to https://loop.dcu.ie/login/index.php to get started.

PROGRESSION

You have to pass all the modules required by your programme to move from one year to the next, and to graduate. Depending on the module, that means continuous assessment (essays and other projects) or an examination, or a combination. The module lecturer – sometimes with assistance of other academics or external examiners – will assess your work, and decide the % mark. That mark will be considered and approved by the programme board (in this case it adopts the name Progression and Award Board, or PAB), and finally by the university's Academic Council. This sequence matters if you want special circumstances taken into account, or if you want to appeal – procedures outlined below. The details of DCU examination regulations are here: EXAM REGULATiONS LINK

DEADLINES AND DELIVERY

Examinations are held at specific times, during two weeks in January for semester one modules, and during two weeks in May for semester two modules. The exam schedules are published in December and April.

The delivery dates (deadlines) for continuous assessment assignments are set by the lecturer. Lecturers are not obliged to accept work that is delivered late. In that case, your mark for that assignment will be zero. Lecturers who do accept late work are bound by School of Communications policy as follows:

  • for every day late (including Saturday and Sunday) 5% is deducted from the mark before it is issued to you
  • No work will be accepted if it is more than 5 days late.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the presentation of another person’s words, ideas, arguments, concepts or designs as your own. Plagiarism comes in many shapes and forms ranging from the copying without referencing, whole sections of published works, to the unattributed use of text, diagrams, illustrations or formulae taken from the unpublished work of other students. Plagiarism covers not only print but intellectual property rights, which reside in all other media including software. Plagiarism is a very serious offence and allegations of plagiarism may be referred to the Disciplinary Committee of the University.

For detailed information on citing and referencing, you can attend the many workshops that the library hosts during the year. You can also use the excellent online resource LETS, which helps with information literacy, including citing. This can be accessed at your convenience at https://www.dcu.ie/library/lets.shtml .  Download a pdf version of the Citing & Referencing Guide for Students from the Library at: Library

For detailed information on citing and referencing, you can attend the many workshops (on the Glasnevin Campus and St Patrick's Campus) that the library hosts during the year. You can also use the excellent online resource LETS, which helps with information literacy, including citing.